Tag Archive | "Memories"

Ivan Rodriguez Retires a Ranger


Ivan “Pudge” Rodriguez was honored today before the start of the Texas Rangers game with the New York Yankees as he announced his retirement from baseball, and this baseball fan couldn’t be happier.

Pudge will go down as one of the all-time Rangers greats, and easily the greatest catcher of our era. He played 21 seasons breaking into the major leagues at the age of 19. He was a 14-time All-Star and a 13-time Gold Glove winner, including 10 in a row.

He set the standard for catchers defensively during his time. Over the course of his career he had a caught stealing percentage of 46%. That is 15% higher than the league average over the same time period. He led the league 9 times and had 7 seasons where his percentage was over 50%, including 1 season at 60%. He was simply the best defensive catcher I’ve ever seen.

During the 90’s fans go so much pleasure out of seeing him throw a runner out or even better pick a runner off first base. His throws were not only hard but very precise which was what made him so good.

Don’t let his defense fool you though. Most catchers who are great defensively aren’t as good offensively. This wasn’t the case for Pudge. When he first came up to the Majors he was strictly a defensive call up. However, that soon changed as he continued to better himself at the dish culminating in his 1999 MVP season.

In his MVP season, Rodriguez hit .332, 35 home runs, 113 RBI, slugged .558, stole 25 bases, won a gold glove, a silver slugger, and was an all-star. It was quite the year for Pudge. And he would have had a better year in 2000, but he was sidelined late in the year with a broken hand.

In his career he hit 311 home runs, drove in 1332 runs, hit .296, and had an OPS of .798. Not bad for a defensive catcher.

He’ll always have a place in the hearts of Rangers fans. He was a huge part of the Rangers 3 AL West Titles in the 1990s, and he is a sure fire Hall of Famer.

Thanks for the memories Pudge. You will be missed.

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Why Do You Like Baseball?


Not long ago someone asked me why I liked baseball. This person is not a fan. In fact, they are not even from a country that plays baseball so they don’t fully understand the game.

All I could come up with on short notice was “everything”.

I really do love everything about this game – the sounds, the smells, the feeling of a cool breeze on a hot summer’s night – the list goes on and on.

Besides the smell of hot dogs and fresh cut grass, there is so much to love about the game.

Some people say it’s too slow and it takes forever to finish. But I say to them that baseball is a talking sport. The periods between plays gives you time to talk about the game – to talk about what has happened, what might happen, what has happened in past games in similar situations, and so much more. In my opinion, you can’t have enough baseball and being at the park for “free” baseball (extra innings) is one of life’s little pleasures.

I love the game within the game. This is one thing that I have always loved and one reason I think that I have always wanted to be a coach. The chess match that managers play with match ups is exciting. I even love watching the fielders move between batters to see how they play one hitter to pull and the next straight up or as a slap hitter. Even the slightest movement of the middle infielders to get into position for a double play are things that I love watching for.

Then you add in the ballet at the bases with runners and balls arriving at the same time. Some of the greatest enjoyment of a game is before the game watching the middle infielders practice turning two during BP. Watching their footwork around the bag is amazing and they do it with such ease. Having tried to do the same thing they are doing only helps me appreciate it just a little bit more knowing how difficult it is.

It has been said many times that the hardest thing to do in sports is hit a round ball square with a round bat. When they do it and you hear the crack of a bat, it’s a great moment. Now add in that that ball is coming at you at speeds upwards of 100mph with movement and the feat of hitting a ball becomes even more impressive.

I love the non-verbal interactions that are going on at all times. It’s not just between catcher and pitcher or hitter and third base coach but its all over the field. Infielders are communicating with each other. Coaches are communicating with fielders and other coaches. It’s a whirlwind of signs going on at all times.

I think I could go on and on about the different things that I love about the game. Come to think of it, I can’t think of anything I don’t like about the game.

No matter who you root for, they don’t let you down. As Jimmy Fallon said in Fever Pitch:

They’re here. Every April, they’re here. At 1:05 or at 7:05, there is a game. And if it gets rained out, guess what? They make it up to you. Does anyone else in your life do that? The Red Sox don’t get divorced. This is a real family. This is the family that’s here for you. ”

It doesn’t matter if it’s the Red Sox, Cubs, or Rangers. No matter who your team is, they are always there.

The measurements are perfect. How they came up with 90 feet was a stroke of genius. No matter where you go the game is the same, yet different. Each field has its own unique character unlike many other sports where the fields are always the exact same size. The uniqueness of places like Fenway Park or Wrigley leads to added greatness.

Then there are the rivalries, the tradition, the drama, the legends, the stories, the comparisons of old and new players, and so much more.

So tell me, what do you like baseball?

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Way Back Wednesday: Bring Back The Baseball Bunch


What ever happened to the old 80’s kids shows like the Baseball Bunch? I didn’t grow up in the age of baseball on TV 24/7, but I had some good shows to look forward to as a kid. On Saturdays we could look forward to seeing shows like This Week In Baseball (TWIB) with the late great Mel Allen or The Baseball Bunch with Johnny Bench. Both of these shows were kid friendly and helped introduce a whole new generation to the great game.

But what do kids have now? Yes I know TWIB is still around on Fox, but to be honest it doesn’t have the same feel to it since Fox took it over. It’s still a great show, but it seems kids are too busy now to watch it. Are we just a victum of too much available TV? Or are we a victum of the 24 hour networks that show sports non-stop?

All too often I hear kids are intersted in other sports and baseball is falling by the wayside. As someone who has been passionate about the game for as long as I can remember, that is just hard to wrap my mind around. The game has such a history, but when we start to look at the history it seems to deal with a slower paced society. Fathers were playing catch with their sons and coaching little league. Sandlot games were played by the kids in the neighborhood after school and on weekends. Maybe I was just one of the more fortunate ones to experience things like this, or perhaps as Dylan once sang, “The times they are a changing”.

I know this isn’t the case everywhere, but it does seem like life is starting to go at a faster pace. Does this have anything to do with baseball’s loss as the biggest sport in the US? Baseball in itself is a slower paced game than most others. With society becoming an “instant fix” society perhaps the game of baseball just doesn’t fit.

Of course, I don’t believe that and I feel people who don’t give baseball a chance are missing out, but I am biased.

Baseball’s  popularity might not be fading. Overall the decade of 2000-2010 was the best the sport has ever seen attendance wise. However, it seems more and more young players are choosing other sports over baseball. The NFL has become the biggest sport in the US although that might change with a long protracted lockout this next season. In the grand scheme of things, baseball seems to be picking up steam worldwide even without it being a sport in the Olympics anymore.

I guess my main point to this long rant is I would like to see more kids baseball programming. It was such a great show with Hall of Fame baseball players each week giving tips to kids in little league. Add in the greatness of the San Diego Chicken and it was a great combination to not only entertain kids but to educate them as well on baseball and just being a good sport. But I wonder if a show similar to The Baseball Bunch would be a hit today with so much competition on the TV front?

Thoughts?

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Minor League Games vs MLB Games


I love baseball. It’s been a passion of mine for as long as I can remember. I grew up cheering for Dale Murphy and the Atlanta Braves courtesy of TBS, and was hurt the day he was traded to Philly for Jeff Parrett. I celebrated in 1991 when we downed Pitt in the NLCS to make it to the World Series. It was the first time I had ever been able to cheer for “my” team in October, and I still hold a grudge against Lonnie Smith. Yes I know this year will be 20 years and its not good to hold grudges, but come on he should have scored on that double by Pendleton.

Anyway, I am going to get way too far off track if I continue down that road. My point is I love baseball and I love MLB. But there is something I would rather attend if given the chance and that is minor league baseball.

I will watch ANY baseball on TV which might make me a little strange to some. I can remember watching the Silver Bullets play on TV (yep that girls team). I watch Korean baseball all the time with no sound. I hate to miss the Little League World Series and I will watch any and all baseball I find on television. But going to a game, I think I have come to like minor league baseball the best.

The stadiums in MLB are the best in the world, but it has gotten so expensive that it is becoming unafordable for most families. If you are able to score tickets at a good price, it will be in the upper deck where you feel a mile away from the game. However, for the price of that upper deck ticket, and in many cases less, you can attend a minor league game and be close to the action.

Sure you give up watching the best players in the world, but the only difference in the players in the minors from the majors is consistancy. There are some really talented young players in the minors, and talented or not they are busting their hump because they know if they don’t tomorrow they won’t have a job. They are hungry to get to the next level. They hustle. When was the last time you saw a star in the majors hustle when he didn’t have to?

The best thing, besides the typical low cost, is being close to the players. I have been to a few games where I was able to talk to players. One game we talked to the left fielder. In between innings we would ask him where he was from, how he liked the small town he played for, and so on. It was great. He was happy to talk to us, and he promised us a ball if he ever ended the inning with a fly ball. Later in the game when we left to get something to eat while he was at bat, he hit a home run right where we should have been standing and after we returned he wanted to know why we were gone for his big moment. It was great to get down to a personal level with a ballplayer. Just a side note, that player has since made it to the majors.

You will never be able to experience something like that at a MLB game. Sitting so close to the field that the players can hear you when you cheer is great. Getting excited and cheering when someone makes a great play only to have them look your way in acknowledgment that they heard you is an awesome thing. Plus its easy to cheer for someone who is not make a lot of money to play a kids game. They play hard, get paid little, and really do appreciate when you cheer for them. Do you think Aroid really cares if you cheer for him when he makes a play at third base. No, he is only concerned about his paycheck coming tomorrow.

Don’t get me wrong. I love MLB games. It is the highest level of the game anywhere in the world. But when push comes to shove, minor league games give you so much more bang for your buck that they are not to be overlooked. After all imagine how many people will have memories of seeing players like Pujols, Jeter, or Chipper Jones when they were young and in the minors. The player that took the time to talk to us that night in left field might not be a superstar in the majors, but he’ll be a superstar to me for the time we shared and his kindness.

So what do you think, minors or majors?

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Way Back Wednesday – Who would You Invite to Dinner?


Just prior to flying back to South Korea I watched a couple documentaries that included Bill “Spaceman” Lee going to Cuba on baseball trips in Spaceman: A Baseball Odyssey and Gift of the Game. Bill Lee is quite a character, and I thought it would be interesting to sit down to dinner with him one night and talk baseball, politics, or whatever comes to mind for him.

In turn, this got me thinking even more about whom from the world of baseball would I like to sit down to dinner with. We have all heard the question about who you would ask to dinner if you could ask 3 people from any time, but what about baseball?

However, it’s really hard to narrow it down to 3. Can you imagine talking to Shoeless Joe Jackson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Satchel Paige, Josh Gibson, Jackie Robinson, Honus Wagner, or Mickey Mantle?

So here is my attempt, and reasoning behind my decisions, to narrow my list to 3 people from the world of baseball.

1. Ty Cobb – Considered one of the greatest, the greatest by some, ballplayers of all-time, Cobb is a personality that really intrigues me. During his playing days he didn’t have a lot of friends. I just wonder what it would be like to break down the barriers that he seemed to have and get to know the real Ty Cobb. I’d love to get his take on the steroid era, and get his perspective on how players from his day got an edge. Plus I think he would have some amazing stories of fights and other times he was in a ruckus.

2. Babe Ruth – The Babe always seemed to be the cockiest, yet not arrogant like say a Bonds, player from the past. So many times people ask if he would be able to play in today’s game since it has changed so much, and I would love to hear his answer. I think he would have some amazing HSO’s (Hot Sports Opinions) on Barry Bonds, the steroid era, and how the game has change for better or worse.

3. Bill “Spaceman” Lee – His personality is second to none. With him at the table I don’t think I would even have to say a word. He would get the conversation going in every direction but it would never be dull.

So what would be your list? Who would you want to sit down to dinner with if you could?

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Opening Day Memories


Opening Day is romantic, rejuvenating, sentimental, fun, and exciting all rolled in one and to me it should be a national holiday. Baseball is a reminder that spring is here and things are starting a new. For many teams it is the only time of year that many teams have a glimmer of hope.

When I was back in the States working I would use a vacation day to take the day off and either attend a game or sit at home and watch baseball all day long. But with all the good memories come some not so great ones as well.

First, let me take a look at some of the better memories.

I can remember several times waking up early in the morning to catch the first pitch of the season coming from somewhere overseas like Japan. In 2008, the Oakland A’s and Boston Red Sox started the season out in Japan and I was up at 3am (or whatever time it was in the US) to watch those games. Some may call me crazy or say that I am hardcore, but I love it.

Several times I was able to attend Opening Day at the Ballpark in Arlington (dubbed the “Temple” by the guys from Sports Radio 1310 in Dallas). Each time I made it the weather was gorgeous, the fans were lively, and the games were great no matter who won. I love seeing pomp and circumstance around the first game. The pagentry of seeing the anthem being sung by a star sometimes (saw Jessica Simpson sing it before I knew who she was), seeing the giant flag out on the field and either jets/bombers flying over the stadium or the bald eagle flying to home plate. With it all wrapped up in one, it makes for such a great experience.

If I couldn’t make it to a game, my routine would be gathering some “baseball” food such as hot dogs, peanuts, sunflower seeds, and a cold beverage to sit down on the couch and watch as many games as possible. ESPN always did a great job of showing multiple games throughout the day. Then the Holy Grail came along in MLB Extra Innings which used to (don’t know if they still do it) give a free preview for a week.

Missing the first pitch of the season is not something I like to do, but sometimes it happens. This year I just arrived back in South Korea and was a little jet lagged still from the 30 hour trip out here. The first game of the year started about 2am here locally, and I was simply unable to stay up and watch it. It was a little frustrating, but it just wasn’t going to happen. It looks like I will miss the Rangers first game as well on Friday because I don’t have internet in my apartment yet. Again, it is a little frustrating but once things get rolling here again I will be able to watch a lot of baseball since the night games back home come on here in the morning before I go to work.

I seem to have little luck in watching my favorite team play on Opening Day, the Atlanta Braves. This year was jet-lag. Last year I was again in South Korea, but I was up and ready to watch the game only to have MLB.tv not work. That was VERY frustrating. I was up early in the morning and the game was not being shown due to technical difficulties. But this wasn’t the only time I had issues. In 2009, I got the chance to go to Atlanta to see the opening game. I couldn’t have been more excited. For the previous 20+ years I had rooted for the Braves good or bad, but it was always from afar. Being able to attend the festivities was going to be amazing for me. The only problem was nobody told mother nature how excited I was.

The game went into a rain delay as it stormed quite hard. The game was halted and my friend and I went home to watch the game on TV only to have the game to go into extra innings. The Braves did win, I did have a good time, but it wasn’t what I had expected for my first Opening Day in Atlanta. I hope to go back one day to see it once again.

Overall, Opening Day is one of the best days for me, but it really is only the beginning of my favorite part of the year – baseball season. After today there is another 182 days of what I like to refer to as “summer greatness”. Then it gets even better with all the greatness that comes with the fall season and the Fall Classic.

So no matter who you root for, today is a day to renew your love of the game, have faith in your team, and have a little hope that your team will see the light of day in October.

I’d love to hear any stories you have of Opening Day’s from the past.

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Game Souvenirs – What do you take home?


One of my favorite things to do is see a new stadium. I love taking in the atmosphere and views of each new one I visit. But I always try and take something away with me as well. In the past I have gotten hats, t-shirts, towels, and more for souvenirs. But until recently I have never thought about the simple souvenir that I had been collecting already, game tickets.

The problem with hats, t-shirts, and what not are that they are bulky and heavy when traveling. Ticket stubs however are small, light, and easy to keep track of. I kept a stub from each of the games I went to in Korea, and from now on I plan on keeping up with that trend.

What do you keep from new places you visit? I’d be interested in knowing what others keep so leave a comment and let me know.

Below are photos of my ticket stubs. One from each of the 7 stadiums in Korea.

Samsung Lions Ticket Stub

Samsung Lions Ticket Stub

LG Twins Ticket Stub

LG Twins Ticket Stub

NEXEN Heroes Ticket Stub

NEXEN Heroes Ticket Stub

Lotte Giants Ticket Stub

Lotte Giants Ticket Stub

Kia Tigers Ticket Stub

Kia Tigers Ticket Stub

SK Wyverns Ticket Stub

SK Wyverns Ticket Stub

Hanwha Eagles Ticket Stub

Hanwha Eagles Ticket Stub

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Interview: Gar Ryness The Batting Stance Guy


When I was a kid I would stand for hours in the back yard going through all-star lineups.  I would be Will Clark and Dale Murphy, and I know I was horrible at it but it was fun.  Even in the batting cages now it is fun to be Julio Franco or Will Clark.  I know I have never been good at this, but I have found someone who is, Gar Ryness – The Batting Stance Guy.

He has formed sort of a cult following with his amazing ability to mimic hitters from past and present.  He has appeared on Letterman, ESPN, MLB Network, and has become a YouTube favorite. I did a review recently on his new book Batting Stance Guy: A Love Letter to Baseball.

Recently he was kind enough to sit down and share some of his insights with me.

I just finished your book, and I have to say I really enjoyed the stories. But I have one burning question.
What does your personal batting stance look like. Does it resemble anyone or have you lost any ‘natural’ stance at this point?

a) In high school I tried to be Ryne Sandberg. It was a pretty boring stance which might be why I didn’t get off the bench much. In the City Rec Softball playoffs I’ll try either David Justice or Will Clark from the left side. From the right side I’m Greg Gagne.

You have really blown up since I first saw you on the MLB network in 2009. What initially got you started?

a) Falling in love with baseball in 1980 is the real answer, but certainly my buddy and co-author Caleb asking to videotape me imitating Red Sox so he could show his friends in Boston was the start of the ride of the last few years.

Did you think it would ever get this big?

a) Once it got views on YouTube, I thought maybe season ticket holders, or geeks like me could like it, but I certainly never imagined players watching it in the clubhouse. No.
However, everyone with kids will know, it doesn’t matter how big anything gets it’s no big deal to them. They wish I imitated Hannah Montana or the Jonas Brothers, at least then they could meet someone cool.

In your book, Batting Stance Guy: A Love Letter to Baseball, you talk about Kevin Youkilis being the Michelangelo of stances. I know you get a lot of requests to do Youkilis, but do you have a favorite you like to perform?

a) If baseball stance requests were songs from a rock band, then Youkilis, Jeter, Manny, Rickey and Franco are all on the greatest hits album and they’re great to play because everyone can sing alone. But I’m the geek who secretly prefers the B-side songs of that obscure concept album that nobody bought. Guys like Moises Alou, Gary Matthews Sr (The Sarge), and Ben Oglivie are my favorites. There are also some spectacular Japanese stances that are fun to do. The world needs to know about Hitoshi Taneda.

I’ve seen a lot of videos where you perform for players, and every time they are beside themselves with laughter. Has there been any one particular reaction that stands out as either the best or strangest?

a) When visiting Minnesota, I was told my disclaimers about Joe Mauer – “He’ll enter the field right before stretching time. Don’t bother him, let him be, etc etc”. I had no plan to approach him. Jason Kubel, Carlos Gomez and Alexi Casilla were calling out names and laughing when Mauer and Morneau entered the dugout. The entire Twins team laughed pretty hard at my Delmon Young impression. The teams then went into the OF to stretch. I then have a thrilling conversation in the dugout with Bert Blyleven and his brother. Fifteen minutes later, tap on the shoulder, holy smokes, it’s Joe Mauer. He introduces himself, asks me my real name and we talk off camera for 5 minutes. That was pretty great.

Has anyone not been receptive to anything you have done?

a) Josh Beckett and I had an awkward interaction. It was spring training and he wanted me to do pitcher’s hitting stances. I joked with him about doing imitations of catchers like Mike Napoli hitting homers off of him in the post-season. *Crickets*. He told me to keep my day job. We talked for a while longer and he ended shaking my hand while saying, “You’re a funny dude.”

Thanks Josh Beckett.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading your stories and insights on the different teams and ballparks that you have visited. When I visit a new stadium I feel like a kid at Christmas about to open his first present. What are your favorite places to watch a game?

a) Thanks for the kind words about the book. Glad you liked it. Wrigley and Fenway are great but AT&T Park in San Francisco is beautiful. San Diego might be the best for kids w/ tons to do, including building sand castles and playing Wiffleball just outside the park.

As you have gotten more popular over time, have you ever had any strange encounters from fans at games requesting players, hitting tips, or been given suggestions?

a) I’ve been at parties where semi-recognizable actors have asked for a Chipper Jones as their introduction to me. My favorite suggestions are from folks that introduce themselves saying they can do it waaaaay better, then they make me watch them and imitate George Brett right handed or Frank Thomas left handed and implore me that that’s how they bat. Awesome.

Last year you were on the David Letterman show. What was that experience like?

a) Surreal. Like walking on stage at a graduation where you just hope you don’t fall down. If there wasn’t footage, I’d honestly think it never happened. I was thankful he invited me and I can’t think of a Bucket List item that was higher. For real.

You said on Letterman you would like to get your bat into the Hall of Fame. Have you used the same bat since you started?

a) More or less yes. I bought a lot of 6 on ebay. They are all used, because we broke several filming various backyard or FoxSportsNet Bo Jackson bat breaking videos. Then one broke in half while in middle of SFGiants stretching circle. They requested Juan Uribe and he finishes his swing slamming the bat on the ground while quickly raising both hands over his head. Top of the bat broke off. So kids, be careful imitating Juan Uribe’s follow-thru.

You had a lot of great stories in the book. Getting onto the A’s field on an off day, the earthquake during the 1989 World Series. Included in those was watching the 1992 NLCS. You mention how Braves fans love that moment more than the 1995 team winning the World Series; and as a die-hard Braves fan myself, I have to say you are right. I still get goose bumps when listening to the call (although I prefer Skip Carey’s call). What memories stand out the most for you?

a) You won’t like this, but my favorite player of all-time is Kent Hrbek and when Gene Larkin singled home Dan Gladden off Alejandro Pena in Game 7 of the 1991 World Series I sprinted out of my freshman college dorm room to find someone from Minnesota to share the moment with. My roommate from Greece who was into pop art and motor sports didn’t share my excitement. The craziest moment I’ve seen live was Scott Podsednik’s walk-off HR off Brad Lidge to win Game 2 of the 2005 WorldSeries. Crowd went insane. Mostly because we were all frozen.

Lastly, as a huge baseball fan myself, I got to know where you get all of your great t-shirts from? The Rated Rookie, I Still Call It the Jake, and others are simply classics.

a) I agree. Company called No Mas. (NoMas-NYC.com) has a bevy of hip choices. Got them all from there.

I’d like to thank Gar again for taking the time out of his busy schedule to sit down and answer some questions for me.  Pick up his book Batting Stance Guy: A Love Letter to Baseball and check out some of the funny stories he has to tell.  His book brought me back to my childhood in my own backyard.  He is just a baseball fan like the rest of us, and this book shows it.  So take a trip down memory lane to some of the crazier stances of the last 30 years.  It’s worth the ride.

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Chicks Dig the Longball – Nike Commercial


This is by far one of my favorite baseball commercials of all-time.  Featuring Mark McGuire, Tom Glavine, and Greg Maddux.  If you haven’t seen it enjoy; and if you have, enjoy again.

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Book Review – Batting Stance Guy: A Love Letter to Baseball


After seeing Gar Ryness, aka the Batting Stance Guy, on MLB network prior to the start of the 2009 season, I was hooked.  Not only could him imitate the stars of today, but he could imitate the stars of the 70s and 80s that I grew up watching.  But one thing stands out more than any other.  The simple fact that he had down pat a batting stance of a little known catcher from the Houston Astros, Tony Eusebio.  When I saw that, I knew I was watching something special.

Earlier this year Gar came out with his book, Batting Stance Guy: A Love Letter to Baseball. I knew I had to pick up a copy and I was glad to find a bookstore in Seoul that could get me just that.   Gar is great on YouTube where he became a hit, but his writing style, along with friend Caleb Dewart, really struck me as unique, funny, and it brought back so many memories of my childhood.

The book takes you through the 50 best stances of all time where none other than Red Sox slugger Kevin Youkilis stands alone at the top.  The book is chalked full of names you will know and remember like Cal Ripken Jr., Rickey Henderson, Pete Rose, Albert Pujols, and Joe Morgan.  But the genius in this book doesn’t lie with the stars, it lies with all the others like Tony Eusebio, John Wokenfuss (the only player I was not familiar with), Phil Plantier, and Mickey Tettleton.

I was constantly reminded of being in my own backyard as a kid with my own wiffle ball bat.  I would go through lineup after lineup, but one thing remained the same.  Dale Murphy would always have the winning hit in my games.

This is a great book, and a must read for any baseball fan.  It reminds us again that baseball is a game and should be fun.  The stories he tells from childhood to young adulthood are quite humorous.  I mean how many people break into a minor league stadium to reenact the 1992 NLCS game 7 after a wedding rehearsal?

Do yourself a favor.  Pick up this book and take a relaxing stroll down memory lane.  You’ll laugh and remember what it is to be a kid again enjoying the great game.  Don’t forget to head over and check out the Batting Stance Guy’s website as well.  There are a lot of great videos to watch.  From the classic moments, to the best of lineups (an all-temper team anyone?), to past and present great stances, Gar Ryness will have you laughing and wanting to pick up your own wiffle ball bat to practice with.

You can pick up Batting Stance Guy: A Love Letter to Baseball anywhere books are sold.

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New Era (eFashion Solutions)

Quote of the Month

There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit. ~Al Gallagher, 1971

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